A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Branko Tomović

Branko Tomović (Serbian Cyrillic: Бранко Томовић; born June 17, 1980) is a Serbian-German actor. He was born in Münster, Germany, though his actual origin is from the Carpathians in Serbia. His parents emigrated in the 70's from the Golubac Fortress area on the Danube and Branko was raised between Germany and Serbia before he studied acting at the prestigious Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute in New York City. Tomović was first seen on the big screen in the lead role in the American Film Institute/Sundance drama Remote Control, for which he received the OmU-Award at the Potsdam Film Festival.

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Currently settled in London, with his dark, brooding looks he has appeared in striking roles on British Television. He played the creepy main suspect Antoni Pricha, the Morgue Man, in Jack the Ripper thriller Whitechapel, the pyromaniac Junky-Henchman Marek Lisowski in the final episodes of A Touch of Frost and Polish fighter pilot Miroslaw Feric in the World War II drama The Untold Battle of Britain. Tomovic has worked with internationally respected film directors as Ken Loach, Sönke Wortmann and Paul Greengrass. He was named "One to Watch" by Moviescope Magazine in 2008 and recent film credits include The Bourne Ultimatum opposite Matt Damon (Dir. Paul Greengrass), It's a Free World... (Dir. Ken Loach), The Wolf Man (Dir. Joe Johnston), Pope Joan (Dir. Sönke Wortmann) and Interview with a Hitman (Dir. Perry Bhandal). In 2010, he won the 'Best Actor' Award at the San Francisco Short Film Festival and at The Accolade Film Awards for his performance as a Serbian soldier who is tormented by grief and guilt after being a witness of war crimes in the drama Inbetween.

Awards:

  • Philadelphia Documentary & Fiction Film Festival 2011 - Best Actor for "The Crossmaker"
  • Goldie Film Awards 2011 - Special Award for Best Actor for "The Crossmaker"
  • San Francisco Short Film Festival Award 2010 - Best Actor for "Inbetween"
  • The Accolade Film Awards 2010 - Best Leading Actor for "Inbetween"
  • MovieScope Magazine 2008 - "One to Watch"
  • Potsdam Film Festival 2002 - OmU-Award for "Remote Control"

Filmography (Selection):

  • Law and Order UK (2013)
  • Silent Witness (2013)
  • Ein Fall für zwei - Adams Sünde (2013)
  • Entity (2012)
  • Believe the Magic (2012)
  • Interview with a Hitman (2012)
  • Strike Back (2011) (TV)
  • Coming Up - Home (2011) (TV)
  • Will (2011)
  • Tatort (2011) (TV)
  • Polizeiruf 110 (2010) (TV)
  • The Untold Battle of Britain (2010) (TV)
  • A Touch of Frost (2010) (TV)
  • Pope Joan (2009)
  • The Wolf Man (2010)
  • Whitechapel (2009) (TV)
  • Inbetween (2008)
  • Into the Woods (2008)
  • Taximan (2008)
  • Casualty (2008) (TV)
  • The Bourne Ultimatum (2007)
  • It's a Free World... (2007)
  • The Bill (2007) (TV)
  • Amor Fati (2005)
  • Dirty Seed (2005)
  • Casualty (2005) (TV)
  • Siska (2003) (TV)
  • Bella Block (2002) (TV)
  • Remote Control (2001)

Links: 

From Wikipedia


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People Directory

Alexander Dzigurski

By Milana Karlo Bizic

One of America's greatest artists of Serbian extraction, Alexander Dzigurski, recently passed away in San Francisco, near his beloved Pacific Ocean. Dzigurski was an internationally known artist, famous for his unique and colorful seascapes. He was blessed with a prolific talent for capturing the action and color of the sea on canvas. One of his larger canvases (36"x48"), called From Sea to shining Sea, hangs in the Franklin Mint Museum. It was painted in 1976, in honor of the nations Bicentennial, when the Franklin Mint Gallery of American Art commissioned him "as America's finest painter of the sea" to paint his expression of the sea that bounds the beauty of this noble land.

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Publishing

Serbian Americans: History—Culture—Press

by Krinka Vidaković-Petrov, translated from Serbian by Milina Jovanović

Learned, lucid, and deeply perceptive, SERBIAN AMERICANS is an immensely rewarding and readable book, which will give historians invaluable new insights, and general readers exciting new ways to approach the history​ of Serbian printed media. Serbian immigration to the U.S. started dates from the first few decades of 19th c. The first papers were published in San Francisco starting in 1893. During the years of the most intense politicization of the Serbian American community, the Serbian printed media developed quickly with a growing number of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly publications. Newspapers were published in Serbian print shops, while the development of printing presses was a precondition for the growth of publishing in general. Among them were various kinds of books: classical Serbian literature, folksong collections, political pamphlets, works of the earliest Serbian American writers in America (poetry, prose and plays), first translations from English to Serbian, books about Serb immigrants, dictionaries, textbooks, primers, etc.

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