A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Tesla and The Lamplighter - short film

The dream of the World Wireless System is crushed. On the verge of bankruptcy, Tesla accepts trivial job - setting the electric light in the window display of musical instrument store. When a little lamplight girl sees great wizard in window display, the dream becomes reality.

Directed by: Branislav Brkich
Teaser music by: Dragan Calina

Production: iCodeTeam & studioRINGISHPIL

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The Botorić Family

SVETOZAR BOTORIĆ, the first film producer in the Balkans

Svetozar BOTORIĆ was born in 1857 in a small country spot called Botorići (where members of his family still live and dedicate themselves to agriculture), not away from the mountainous village of Opaljenik, 20 km distant from Ivanjica, i.e. 240 km far from Belgrade. Following his arrival in Belgrade, S. Botorić worked in various commercial businesses; as an exceptional hard-worker, he succeeded in saving money and acquired successively a coffe-shop and a restaurant; finally, he became (in May 1899) the owner of the hotel «Paris», located at Terazije (centre of Belgrade). Quickly, he had intuition of the importance of cinema industry, opened a movie theater in his hotel and became the representative of the famous «Pathé frères» film company in the Balkans. Then, he invested his own resources (State subsidies did not exist) and, in a short period (1911-1914), he produced two feature films and twenty documentaries. His whole activity was designed to help his country and Serbian people and leave spiritual and cultural legacy to future generations. His patriotic work did not stay unnoticed by Serbian enemies : promptly after their invading of Serbia (1915), Austro-Hungarians sent him to a concentration camp in Nežider. S.Botorić died there on November 27th 1916, leaving his widow Slavka with three minor children: his son Miloš (13 years old), daughter Roksanda (9y) and little Stanica (7 yrs). Slavka Botorić did not marry again and succeeded in bringing up her children (all of them had university degrees), asking them to never forget their roots and spiritual and cultural Serbian traditions.

American Wartime Film: Chetniks! The Fighting Guerrillas (1943)

The 1943 American movie Chetniks! The Fighting Guerrillas is a time capsule that shows how Draza Mihailovich and the Chetnik guerrillas were integral parts of the American and Allied war effort. At the height of World War II in 1943, the movie demonstrated their influence and impact on the “greatest generation”. The movie had a widespread impact not only on the American home front, but globally as well.

Prelude to War: Pacifism

When World War II started on September 1, 1939 with the German invasion of Poland, the American public opposed U.S. involvement. Americans were disillusioned with war. World War I had been the war to make the world safe for democracy and the war to end all wars. Instead, the war had created anger and disillusionment. Instead of a negotiated peace settlement, victor’s justice was imposed. The Versailles Treaty was a punitive settlement that rewarded the victors and despoiled the losing countries. Reparations were imposed on Germany that destroyed its economy. One immediate consequence was the financial and economic malaise and collapse in Germany that was the seedbed for extremists like Adolf Hitler. Hitler’s popularity rose and fell in inverse proportion as the economy did.

Woodrow Wilson had created the conditions that allowed for the emergence of Adolf Hitler and World War II. By entering World War I on the side of Britain and France in 1917 to save American bankers such as J.P. Morgan, who were financing the war, he tilted the balance of the war. The American public was against the war and had vehemently opposed U.S. entry. Wilson was re-elected because he had pledged to voters that he would keep the U.S. out of the war. If the U.S. stayed neutral, there would have been a negotiated settlement to end the war because by 1917 the conflict had reached a stalemate. In a controversial punitive settlement, Germany would lose huge chunks of territory and be made guilty of starting the war. By stripping Germany of territory and making Germany pay war reparations, Wilson destroyed the German economy and impoverished the German people. Adolf Hitler exploited this injustice and the road to World War II was thus paved. Wilson did not make the world safe for democracy. He made the world very unsafe. And the American people knew it. This was why Americas did not want to enter World War II.

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SA

 

People Directory

Pete Maravich

Peter Press "Pete" Maravich (June 22nd, 1947 - January 5th, 1988) was a legendary basketball player known for his incredible shooting abilities, creative passing, and dazzling ball handling. He was included in the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1987. Also known as "Pistol Pete" he starred in college and for three NBA teams. Maravich is still the all-time leading NCAA scorer, averaging a staggering 44.2 points per game, without the benefit of a 3-point shot line.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.