A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Predrag Cicovacki

Professor at the College of the Holy Cross

Research Interests: Kant, Dostoevsky, Schweitzer, Gandhi; Problems of evil and violence; Theories of Values

Special Interests: National Chess Master and honorary member of Alpha Sigma Nu (2004-present)

Predrag Cicovacki is Professor of Philosophy and O'Leary Research Fellow at the College of the Holy Cross (USA). He has been teaching at Holy Cross since 1991. He also served as a visiting professor in Germany, Russia, Luxembourg, Serbia, and France.

Professor Cicovacki's areas of specialization are: problems of good and evil, violence and nonviolence, philosophy of war and peace, and ethics. His teaching and research is often focusing on the works of Kant, Hartmann, Schweitzer, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Gandhi.

Professor Cicovacki's recently taught courses include: Gandhi's Way of Peace, Nonviolent Movements in the World, Philosophers on War and Peace, Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies, Introduction to Philosophy, Philosophy and Literature, Philosophical Anthropology, Love and Wisdom, Reality and Utopia, Kant's Moral Philosophy, Globalization and Its Values, Theory of Value, Kant Seminar, Dostoevsky Seminar, Tolstoy Seminar, Seminar on Albert Schweitzer and Reverence for Life.

Professor Cicovacki published over 75 essays in various scholarly publications. These essays are published in, or translated into, English, Serbian, German, Russian, Slovenian, Chinese, and Japanese.  

He is also author and editor of thirteen books, the latest of which are Dostoevsky and the Affirmation of Life (2012) and The Restoration of Albert Schweitzer's Ethical Vision (2012). He is editor of The Ethics of Nonviolence (2013). His forthcoming book (2014) is The Analysis of Wonder: An Introduction to Nicolai Hartmann's Philosophy, and he is currently preparing his own book on Gandhi ("Gandhi's Legacy") and editing a collection of essays on the practical application of nonviolence.

In the Fall-Winter 2012-13, Professor Cicovacki was a Senior Fulbright-Nehru Fellow at the Malaviya Centre for Peace Research, at Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, India. After his return from India, he was selected to be a Fulbright Peer Reviewer (India, Humanities; Fall 2013 - Summer 2016).

Since 2010, Cicovacki has been a Member of Global Research Team, Center for Global Nonkilling, at Honolulu, Hawai'i. Since June of 2013, he is a member of the Editorial Board of the international journal «Философия и культура» (Philosophy and Culture), published in Moscow, Russia, since 2006.

Source: College of the Holy Cross


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Bogdan Maglich

Bogdan Maglich (also spelled Maglic or Maglić) (born August 5, 1928 in Sombor, Yugoslavia) is a nuclear physicist and the leading advocate of a purported non-radioactive aneutronic fusion energy source. Maglich's Migma fusion would use colliding ion beams. He is the son of a lawyer and elected member of the Yugoslav Royal Parliament. At the age of 12, he and his mother were imprisoned in a Croatian Nazi concentration camp for Serbs, but they subsequently escaped.

Maglich received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Belgrade in 1951, his Master of Science degree from theUniversity of Liverpool in 1955, and his Ph.D. in high-energy physics and nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. Upon receiving his Ph.D., Maglich joined Dr. Louis Alvarez's research group at Lawrence Berkely Lab. During this time, he participated in the discovery of the omega meson and invented the "sonic spark chamber".

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Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).