Many times, we, the immigrants, have gone to other countries and not lost our faith and our character, but have often rediscovered and lived them better.
- Anonymous

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson


People Directory

Tomislav Z. Longinović

Professor of Slavic, Comparative Literature and Visual Culture
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1452 Van Hise
1220 Linden Dr
Madison, WI 53706
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Born and raised in Belgrade, Longinovic holds degrees in creative writing, psychology and has his Ph.D in comparative literature.

His books include Borderline Culture (1993), Vampires Like Us (2005), the co-edited and co-translated volume, with Daniel Weissbort: Red Knight: Serbian Women Songs (1992), and the edited volume: David Albahari, Words are Something Else (1996). He is also the author of several works of fiction, both in Serbian (Sama Amerika, 1995) and English (Moment of Silence, 1990).

His most recent book, Vampire Nation: Violence as Cultural Imaginary, was published by Duke University Press in 2011. His research interests include South Slavic literatures and cultures; the Serbian language; literary theory; Central and East European literary history; comparative Slavic studies, translation studies, and cultural studies.

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On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.



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