A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Sedam generala srpskog porekla

piše: Marko Lopušina

Admiral Stevan Mandarić bio je ratni heroj i osvajač Japana, a Rudolf Ostović sa 35 godina najmlađi američki general i savetnik Kolina Pauela. Tereza Đurić ušla u anale američke vojske - 2008. postala je brigadni general.

SVAKAKO najpoznatiji srpski oficir u Americi bio je admiral Stevan Mandarić. Ovaj potomak naših iseljenika rođen je 1911. u Feniksu. Njegov otac Samojlo Mandarić došao je iz Vrepca u Liki, a majka Sofija rođena je u Slavoniji. Još u srednjoj školi Stevan je postao posvećen vojsci kao "haj skul kadet". Sa 14 godina, tvrdeći da ima 18, priključio se Nacionalnoj gardi. Istovremeno je radio u novinama u Freznou kao reporter. Tri godine kasnije postao je narednik u Nacionalnoj gardi. Bio je jedan od retkih Srba koji su završili Pomorsku akademiju u Anapolisu, u državi Merilend.

Kada je kalifornijski kongresmen Barbur postavio 18-godišnjeg Stevana Mandarića u američku Pomorsku akademiju 1929. godine, niko nije mogao zamisliti šta će sve tog mladića čekati u tri decenije dugoj pomorskoj karijeri.

Allex Mandusich

Andjelko "Big Jake Alex" Mandusich is a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, and was one of the greatest Serbian-American heroes of World War I.

He was born on July 13th, 1887 at Sar Planina, Serbia. In 1905, at the age of 18, he immigrated to America.

When the US entered World War I, Mandusich immediately enrolled himself in the Army. During the battle in Amiens region in France in August of 1918, Jake, now a corporal, advanced his men at Chipilly Ridge; there were many casualties and in the heat of the battle Alex realized that all officers had been hit and that he was now the leader of his platoon. His men were pinned down by machine gunfire from a German nest thirty yards away. Under intense fire Manudsich made his way to the nest alone; he pulled out his bayonet and attacked..

Louis Cukela

Louis Cukela (May 1st, 1888 - March 19th, 1956) was a famous United States Marine. He was awarded both the Navy and Army Medals of Honor, as well as numerous decorations from France, Italy, and his native Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

He was born and raised in Split (while it was still under Austro-Hungarian rule), and subsequently attended the Merchant Academy and later, the Royal Gymnasium, both for two years. In 1913, Cukela emigrated to the United States and, with his brother, settled in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

On September 21st, 1914, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. Three years later, on January 31st 1917, with war raging in Europe, he enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps. Following the United States' entry into the conflict, he went to France and fought alongside his servicemen in the 5th Marines.

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Peter Tomich

Peter Tomich (June 3rd, 1893 - December 7th, 1941) was born in Prolog, at that time in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. For his courage during the raid on Pearl Harbor he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

During World War I he served in the US Army. After enlisting in the United States Navy in January 1919, he initially served on the destroyer Litchfield.

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Mitchell Paige

Mitchell Paige was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic efforts on Oct. 26th, 1942 at Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

Col. Paige was born in a small western Pennsylvania town of Charleroi, near the Ohio state line. His parents were Serb immigrants who came to the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century from the Serbian Vojna Krajina, which was back then a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. .

Milo Radulovich

Milo John Radulovich (October 28, 1926 – November 19, 2007) was an American citizen (born in Detroit) of Serbian descent and former reserve Air Force lieutenant who was accused of being a security risk for maintaining a "close and continuing relationship" with his father and sister, in violation of Air Force regulation 35-62. His case was publicized nationally by Edward Murrow on October 20, 1953, on Murrow's program, See It Now:

“That [Air Force regulation 35-62] is a regulation which states that 'A man may be regarded as a security risk if he has close and continuing associations with communists or people believed to have communist sympathies.' Lieutenant Radulovich was asked to resign in August. He declined. A board was called and heard his case. At the end, it was recommended that he be severed from the Air Force. Although it was also stated that there was no question whatever as to the Lieutenant's loyalty.—Edward R. Murrow”

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Mele "Mel" Vojvodich

Mele Vojvodich Jr. was born of Serbian ancestry on March 28, 1929 in Steubenville, Ohio. He went on to become Major-General in the USAF. For his bravery he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

Looking back at the career, Vojvodich received his pilot wings in 1950 from Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. Six years later, he graduated from Squadron Officer School at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. During 1971, he completed his studies at National War College Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington DC.

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Lance Sijan

Lance Peter Sijan (April 13th, 1942 - January 22nd, 1968) was a United States Air Force officer and fighter pilot. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his selflessness and courage.

Sijan was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1942 from a Serbian father and Irish mother. He graduated from the United States Air Force Academy in 1965, and after attending pilot training, was assigned to the 366th Wing at Da Nang Air Base, Vietnam.

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People Directory

Константин Фотић

Константин Д. Фотић (Шабац, 1891 - Вашингтон, 1959) школовао се у Шапцу, а затим завршио права у Бордоу. У Балканским paтовима служио је као коњички официр,  а током I светског рата као официр за везу са Француском војном командом на Солунском фронту; 1915. постављен је у Министарство спољних послова Краљевине Србије и са Николом Пашићем учествовао на мировним преговорима у Паризу. Kао дипломата је службовао је Берну, Лондону, Паризу, Стокхолму, Бeчу итд., а обављао је и разне дужности у министарству спољних послова Краљевине СХС/Југославије (шеф Одељења за Лигу народа, директор Политичког одељења, помоћник министра спољних послова). Као стални делегат Југославије при Друштву народа, учествовао је на скоро свим међународним конференцијама од 1926. до 1935. Смишљене интервенције и контруктивни предлози донели су Фoтићу велики углед међу колегама; често је био позиван да равноправно са делегатима великих сила учествује у најважнијим састанцима водећих европских државника.

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Publishing

Notes On Ecumenism

Written in 1972 by St. Abba Justin Popovich, edited by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, translated from Serbian by Aleksandra Stojanovich, and proofread by Fr Miroljub Ruzich

Abba Justin’s manuscript legacy (on which Bishop Athanasius have been working for a couple of years preparing an edition of The Complete Works ), also includes a parcel of sheets/small sheets of paper (in the 1/4 A4 size) with the notes on Ecumenism (written in pencil and dating from the period when he was working on his book “The Orthodox Church and Ecumenism”; there are also references to the writings of St. Bishop Nikolai [Velimirovich], short excerpts copied from his Sermons, some of which were quoted in the book).

The editor presents the Notes authentically, as he has found them in the manuscripts (his words inserted in the text, as clarification, are put between the slashes /…/; all the footnotes are ours).—In the appendix are present the facsimiles of the majority of Abba’s Notes which were supposed to be included in his book On Ecumenism (written in haste then, but now significantly supplemented with these Notes. The Notes make evident the full extent of Justin’s profundity as a theologian and ecclesiologist of the authentic Orthodoxy).—The real Justin is present in these Notes: by his original language, style, literature, polemics, philosophy, theology, and above all by his confession of the God-man Christ and His Church. He confesses his faith, tradition, experience and his perspective on man, on the world and on Europe—invariably in the Church and from the Church, in the God-man Christ and from Him, just as he did in all of his writings and in his entire life and theologizing.