A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Predrag Cicovacki

Professor at the College of the Holy Cross

Research Interests: Kant, Dostoevsky, Schweitzer, Gandhi; Problems of evil and violence; Theories of Values

Special Interests: National Chess Master and honorary member of Alpha Sigma Nu (2004-present)

Predrag Cicovacki is Professor of Philosophy and O'Leary Research Fellow at the College of the Holy Cross (USA). He has been teaching at Holy Cross since 1991. He also served as a visiting professor in Germany, Russia, Luxembourg, Serbia, and France.

Professor Cicovacki's areas of specialization are: problems of good and evil, violence and nonviolence, philosophy of war and peace, and ethics. His teaching and research is often focusing on the works of Kant, Hartmann, Schweitzer, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Gandhi.

Professor Cicovacki's recently taught courses include: Gandhi's Way of Peace, Nonviolent Movements in the World, Philosophers on War and Peace, Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies, Introduction to Philosophy, Philosophy and Literature, Philosophical Anthropology, Love and Wisdom, Reality and Utopia, Kant's Moral Philosophy, Globalization and Its Values, Theory of Value, Kant Seminar, Dostoevsky Seminar, Tolstoy Seminar, Seminar on Albert Schweitzer and Reverence for Life.

Professor Cicovacki published over 75 essays in various scholarly publications. These essays are published in, or translated into, English, Serbian, German, Russian, Slovenian, Chinese, and Japanese.  

He is also author and editor of thirteen books, the latest of which are Dostoevsky and the Affirmation of Life (2012) and The Restoration of Albert Schweitzer's Ethical Vision (2012). He is editor of The Ethics of Nonviolence (2013). His forthcoming book (2014) is The Analysis of Wonder: An Introduction to Nicolai Hartmann's Philosophy, and he is currently preparing his own book on Gandhi ("Gandhi's Legacy") and editing a collection of essays on the practical application of nonviolence.

In the Fall-Winter 2012-13, Professor Cicovacki was a Senior Fulbright-Nehru Fellow at the Malaviya Centre for Peace Research, at Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, India. After his return from India, he was selected to be a Fulbright Peer Reviewer (India, Humanities; Fall 2013 - Summer 2016).

Since 2010, Cicovacki has been a Member of Global Research Team, Center for Global Nonkilling, at Honolulu, Hawai'i. Since June of 2013, he is a member of the Editorial Board of the international journal «Философия и культура» (Philosophy and Culture), published in Moscow, Russia, since 2006.

Source: College of the Holy Cross


SA

 

People Directory

Ivan Ciric

Professor of neurosurgery at the University of Chicago Medical School

Ivan S. Ciric was born on December 15, 1933 in Vienna, Austria. Dr. Ciric grew up in Sremski Karlovci. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Belgrade and Doctor of Medicine from the University of Cologne, Germany. Dr. Ciric trained under Professor Wilhelm Tonnis at the University of Cologne from 1961 to 1963 and under Dr. Paul Bucy at Northwestern University Medical School from 1963 to 1967. That year he received additional training in stereotactic surgery under Dr. Claude Bertrand and in pituitary surgery under Dr. Jules Hardy at the Notre Dame Hospital in Montreal. Dr. Ciric is Professor of Neurosurgery at Northwestern University Medical School, Vice Chairman of the Department of Neurological Surgery and Chief of the Neurosurgery Service at the Evanston Hospital where he holds the Bennett - Tarkington Chair of Neurosurgery.

Read more ...

Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."