A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Sava Vemić

Sava Vemić (born 1987), bass, comes from Belgrade, Serbia. He is a member of The Metropolitan Opera’s Lindemann Young Artist Development Program in the season 2014/2015.

He studied singing in the Music School Mokranjac with prof. Tanja Obrenović and later at the Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade with prof. Nikola Mijailović. In Mozart’s Magic flute he made his debut as Sarastro at the opera stage of Madlenianum Opera & Theatre in Belgrade. He received scholarships from the International Vocal Arts Institute (IVAI) in 2013 when he sang Bartolo in an IVAI production of Le nozze di Figaro and in July 2014 when he sang Osmin in their production of Die Entführung aus dem Serial in Tel Aviv, Israel. In June 2014 he made his Carnegie Hall debut as Sir Walter Raleigh in Donizetti’s opera Roberto Devereux with The Opera Orchestra of New York led by Mo. Queler. In 2012 he performed at the Esterhazy festival in Haydnsaal, Austria.

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During his education he was awarded with several prizes: 1st Prize Award at the Gerda Lissner International Vocal Competition, New York, 2014; Danica Mastilović’s Award for the best student of solo-singing department at the University of Arts in Belgrade, 2014; Publikumspreis der Stadt Beeskow in the frame of the international Opera Course Oper Oder-Spree, Germany, 2011; 1st Prize at the sixth Solo Singers Competition Lazar Jovanović, Serbia, 2008.

Beside music he holds a Master degree in Pharmacy from the Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade.


SA

 

People Directory

Metropolitan Irinej (Kovačević)

(1963–1998)

Milan Kovačević was born to Sreten and Kristine Kovačević on 6 September, 1914, in the village Vrnčani near Gornji Milanovac in the Kingdom of Serbia. Milan completed primary school in his village, and high school in Gornji Milanovac. After completing the course at the Teachers High School, he served as a teacher in the village Ljutovnica near Gornji Milanovac.

In 1941, during World War II, because he was at that time an army reserve officer, he was taken by the Nazis to a camp in Germany, where he remained until 1945. After the liberation, Milan went to England, where he temporarily attended a seminary in Dorchester.

In 1950, he emigrated to the USA, and he enrolled in the Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York, and also in Columbia University.

In October, 1953, Milan entered the Serbian Orthodox Monastery of Saint Sava in Libertyville, Illinois. On 30 December, 1953, he was tonsured to be a monk by Archimandrite Firmilian (Ocokoljić), and he was given the name Irinej. On 31 December, 1953, the Monk Irinej was ordained to the Holy Diaconate in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije, while on April, 1954, the Hierodeacon Irinej was ordained to the priesthood in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije. On 31 August, 1956, the Hieromonk Irinej was elevated to the dignity of igumen (abbot).

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Publishing

Serbian Americans: History—Culture—Press

by Krinka Vidaković-Petrov, translated from Serbian by Milina Jovanović

Learned, lucid, and deeply perceptive, SERBIAN AMERICANS is an immensely rewarding and readable book, which will give historians invaluable new insights, and general readers exciting new ways to approach the history​ of Serbian printed media. Serbian immigration to the U.S. started dates from the first few decades of 19th c. The first papers were published in San Francisco starting in 1893. During the years of the most intense politicization of the Serbian American community, the Serbian printed media developed quickly with a growing number of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly publications. Newspapers were published in Serbian print shops, while the development of printing presses was a precondition for the growth of publishing in general. Among them were various kinds of books: classical Serbian literature, folksong collections, political pamphlets, works of the earliest Serbian American writers in America (poetry, prose and plays), first translations from English to Serbian, books about Serb immigrants, dictionaries, textbooks, primers, etc.

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