A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Milo Radulovich

Milo John Radulovich (October 28, 1926 – November 19, 2007) was an American citizen (born in Detroit) of Serbian descent and former reserve Air Force lieutenant who was accused of being a security risk for maintaining a "close and continuing relationship" with his father and sister, in violation of Air Force regulation 35-62. His case was publicized nationally by Edward Murrow on October 20, 1953, on Murrow's program, See It Now:

“That [Air Force regulation 35-62] is a regulation which states that 'A man may be regarded as a security risk if he has close and continuing associations with communists or people believed to have communist sympathies.' Lieutenant Radulovich was asked to resign in August. He declined. A board was called and heard his case. At the end, it was recommended that he be severed from the Air Force. Although it was also stated that there was no question whatever as to the Lieutenant's loyalty.—Edward R. Murrow”

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In 1953, Radulovich, a lieutenant in the Air Force reserve in Dexter, Michigan, was discharged because his father and sister were accused of being communists or communist sympathizers. It is believed that the basis of this determination was that his father, a Yugoslav immigrant, kept up on events in his homeland by subscribing to a number of Serbian newspapers. One of these papers was associated with the American Slav Congress, which had been labeled as Communist by the American government. His sister, Margaret Radulovich was a supporter of liberal causes, but she maintained that she was "apolitical". Whatever evidence there was against the Lieutenant or his family was contained in a manila envelope not shared with Radulovich or his attorney.

Radulovich demanded an Air Force hearing, aided by retired lawyer Charles Lockwood, who worked pro bono. Lockwood contacted an editor at the Detroit News, which ran a story about the situation. Among the readers was a former classmate of Radulovich, attorney Kenneth Sanborn (who went on to become a State Representative and Macomb County Circuit Judge in Michigan). He also was an Air Force lieutenant and also accepted no fee for his services. Radulovich was granted a hearing at which the sealed manila envelope was brandished and waved by the attorney for the USAF. However, the envelope was never opened and neither the board members nor anyone in the Radulovich camp were permitted to see its contents.

The Air Force stripped Radulovich of his commission, which came to the attention of Edward R. Murrow, host of the popular See It Now program on CBS. For months, Murrow, producer Fred Friendly and the See It Now team had debated on how to address McCarthy's witch hunt, until the Radulovich affair. A crew (Reporter/Assistant producer Joseph Wershba and cameraman Charlie Mack) went to Dexter and filmed passionate interviews with the lieutenant and his family. Attorney Lockwood also appeared, and declared on national television "In my 32 years of practicing... I have never witnessed such a farce and travesty upon justice as this thing has developed into."

The program aired on October 20, 1953. The image of this man and his immigrant father led many viewers to question the impact of McCarthyist tactics for purging the government and military of potential security risks. Radulovich was reinstated one month after the broadcast.

Radulovich moved to California where, despite his reinstatement, he had trouble getting work. He was hired by a private weather forecasting business, later went to work for the National Weather Service, and was chief meteorologist at Capital City Airport in Lansing, Michigan when he retired in 1994.

Michael Ranville wrote a book about Radulovich's trial, To Strike at a King: The Turning Point in the McCarthy Witch-Hunt. The CBS broadcast and background to its airing was dramatized in the 2005 film Good Night, and Good Luck. Mr. Radulovich himself is interviewed in the "special features" segment on the Good Night, and Good Luck DVD released on March 14, 2006.

After experiencing two strokes and other more minor medical conditions, Radulovich died November 19, 2007. In 2008, The Board of Regents of the University of Michigan approved a posthumous Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in physics for Radulovich.

His case is recognized by the State Bar of Michigan as one of its "Michigan Legal Milestones".

From Wikipedia


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People Directory

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic was born in Belgrade, Serbia. She has captured the attention of audience and critics alike since her concerto debut at Ganz Rudolph Hall in Chicago in 2005 where one of the most famous pianists alive, Abbey Simon (Professor at the Juilliard School) personally attended the concert and highly acclaimed her performance of Bach and Chopin. At the age of six Marta took her first piano lesson and already a year later she played her first public concert. She was 21 when she graduated at the Music Art Academy in Belgrade as the youngest student with the highest GPA in the generation. She received her early musical training in class of Russian Professor Jakuthon Mlhailovich, a graduate from the Moscow Conservatory. At the same time she has also completed Media studies at the University of Art in Belgrade. During her studies, she worked with eminent artists from her country and auended a number of piano master courses of the following Professors: Sijavus Gadzijev (Moscow). Tamara Stefanovic (Koeln). Dr. David Abot (Zurich-New York), Dr. Tatjana Rankovich (New York), Dr. Omitry Rachmanov (Chicago-New York) and many others.

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Publishing

The Prologue of Ohrid

St Nikolai of Zica (Velimirovic) (1880-1956) has been called the "Serbian Chrysostom" for his theological depth and golden-tongued eloquence. Now for the first time, a complete and unabridged English translation of St. Nikolai's Prologue of Ohrid has been made available. St. Nikolai's Prologue has become a much-loved spiritual classic for Orthodox Christians worldwide. An inspirational source-book of the Orthodox Faith, it contains within its pages a summation of the Church's wisdom and Her experience of sanctity through the Grace of Jesus Christ. Lives of Saints, Hymns, Reflections and Homilies are presented for every day of the year. St. Nikolai's beautiful Hymns have never before appeared in English.

The text of this 1,450-page magnum opus of St. Nikolai has been translated from the Serbian and edited by clergy and monastics of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Western America.

In two volumes, hardbound, with full-color dust jackets.
New 2nd Edition 2008
Volume I: January to June, 650 pages (ISBN 0-9719505-0-4)
Volume II: July to December, 704 pages (ISBN 0-9719505-1-2)