A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Janko Nikolich-Zugich

Janko Nikolich-Zugich received his MD from Belgrade University Medical School in 1984, subsequently receiving an MSc and a PhD in Immunology from the same University. Dr. Nikolich-Zugich worked from 1987 to 1990 as a Research Associate at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in the laboratory of Dr. Michael J. Bevan, FRS, NAS, HHMI. In 1990, he joined the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York as the Head of both the Flow Cytometry Core Facility and the Laboratory of T Cell Development. He served as an Assistant Professor (1990-1996) and an Associate Professor (1996-2001) at both the Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences and the Division of Molecular Medicine in Cornell University School of Medicine.

He was recipient of the Pew Biomedical Scholar Award and the Louise and Allston Boyer Young Scientist Award. Dr. Nikolich-Zugich moved to the Oregon Health & Science University in 2001, assuming position of Senior Scientist at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and joint appointments as a Professor (tenured) in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology and a Senior Scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. He was member of the NIH Cellular and Molecular Immunology-B Study Section from 2003-2008, is member of multiple NIA and NIAID review panels, and is on the organizing or scientific committees for several international conferences and meetings. He was President of the American Aging Association in 2009-10. In 2008, Dr. Nikolich-Zugich moved to the University of Arizona to lead the Department of Immunobiology and the Arizona Center on Aging. He can be reached by e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Primary Affiliation:

  • Professor and Chair, Dept. of Immunobiology
  • Co-Director, Arizona Center on Aging
  • University of Arizona College of Medicine

Other Affiliations
Elizabeth Bowman Professor in Medical Research Member, BIO5 Institute Member and Board Member, Arizona Cancer Center Professor, Departments of Medicine, College of Medicine, and Nutrition, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Member, McKnight Brain Center Affiliate Scientist, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR

Research:

From The University of Arizona, Department of Immunobiology


SA

 

People Directory

Ivan Ciric

Professor of neurosurgery at the University of Chicago Medical School

Ivan S. Ciric was born on December 15, 1933 in Vienna, Austria. Dr. Ciric grew up in Sremski Karlovci. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Belgrade and Doctor of Medicine from the University of Cologne, Germany. Dr. Ciric trained under Professor Wilhelm Tonnis at the University of Cologne from 1961 to 1963 and under Dr. Paul Bucy at Northwestern University Medical School from 1963 to 1967. That year he received additional training in stereotactic surgery under Dr. Claude Bertrand and in pituitary surgery under Dr. Jules Hardy at the Notre Dame Hospital in Montreal. Dr. Ciric is Professor of Neurosurgery at Northwestern University Medical School, Vice Chairman of the Department of Neurological Surgery and Chief of the Neurosurgery Service at the Evanston Hospital where he holds the Bennett - Tarkington Chair of Neurosurgery.

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Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."