A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Charles Simic

Charles Simic (born May 9th, 1938) is an American poet. He was born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Republic of Serbia), his childhood was very traumatic, as in the WWII Nazi and Allied bombers ravaged his homeland. Simic emigrated to the USA in 1953 to rejoin his father, who was living in New York City. They moved to Chicago shortly after his arrival. Simic first started to write poetry in high school, when he realized "that one of my friends was attracting the best-looking girls by writing them sappy love poems".

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His first poems were published in 1959, when he was twenty-one. Simic was drafted into the army in 1961. In 1966, he graduated from New York University while working nights to pay for his tuition.

Since that time, Simic has written prolifically, producing over 60 books of published both in the US and abroad. In 1973, Simic moved to New Hampshire, where he is now a professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. He and his wife, Helenne, have two children, Anna and Phillipe. In 1990, Simic won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for his collection The World Doesn't End: Prose Poems. He has also won awards for his works Walking the Black Cat and Classic Ballroom Dances. Simic was elected to The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1995, which can be considered the highest formal recognition of artistic merit in the United States. Simic served as the Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 2000 until 2002.


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People Directory

Matea Prljevic

As a child growing up in Serbia, music was always a part of my life. Starting with the piano I soon became inspired and fell in love with the classical guitar. I was lucky enough to get into a musical high school in Belgrade where I could focus my entire attention into developing into a mature musician. Besides studying music production, that’s when I became aware of composition and more specifically composition for film.

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Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."