A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30th, 1939) is an accomplished American film director and writer. He is a son of immigrants fleeing the Nazis, his father a Serbian painter and pianist and his mother a descendant of a wealthy Austrian Jewish family. Bogdanovich was born in Kingston, New York.

He was influenced by the French critics of the 1950s who wrote for Cahiers du Cinema, especially criticturned-director Francois Truffaut. Before becoming a director himself, he built his reputation as a film writer with articles in Esquire.. In 1968, following the example of Cahiers du Cinema critics Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Claude Chabrol, and Eric Rohmer who had created the Nouvelle Vague ("New Wave") by making their own films, Bogdanovich decided to became a director. He went onto work with Corman on the critically praised Targets and Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women. Bogdanvich later referred to Corman and his company as the best film school he could ever have when he made his first feature film.

Turning back to journalism, Bogdanovich struck up a life-long friendship with the legendary Orson Welles while interviewing him on the set of Mike Nichols's adaptation of Joseph Heller's Catch-22. Subsequently, Bogdanovich has played a major role in elucidating Welles and his career with his writings on the great actordirector, most notably his book This is Orson Welles (1992).

The 32-year old Bogdanovich was hailed by a critics as a Wellesian wunderkind when his most famous film, The Last Picture Show, was released in 1971. The film received eight Academy Award nominations, including Bogdanovich as Best Director, and won two of them, for Cloris Leachman and Ford film veteran Ben Johnson in the supporting acting categories.

Bogdanovich followed up The Last Picture Show with a major hit, What's Up, Doc? (1972), a screw-ball comedy heavily indebted to Hawks' Bringing Up Baby (1937) and His Girl Friday (1941), starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal. Despite his reliance on homage to bygone cinema, Bogdanovich had solidified his status as one of a new breed of A-list directors that included Academy Award winners Francis Ford Coppola and William Friedkin, with whom he formed The Directors Company. It was through this entity that Bogdanovich's next big hit, the critically praised Paper Moon (1973), was produced.

Paper Moon, a Depression-era comedy starring Ryan O'Neal that won his 10-yearold daughter Tatum O'Neal an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress, proved to be the highest point of Bogdanovich's career. The Directors Company subsequently produced only two more pictures, Coppola's critically acclaimed The Conversation, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture of 1974 and garnered Coppola an Oscar nod for Best Director, and Bogdanovich's Daisy Miller, a film that had a quite different critical reception.

In 1998, the National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress named The Last Picture Show to the National Film Registry, an honor awarded only to the most culturally significant films.

Filmography:

  • Hustle (2004) (made for TV, ESPN)
  • The Cat's Meow (2001)
  • The Thing Called Love (1993)
  • Noises Off (1992)
  • Texasville (1990)
  • Illegally Yours (1988)
  • Mask (1985)
  • They All Laughed (1981)
  • Saint Jack (\919)
  • Nickelodeon (1976)
  • At Long Last Love (\915)
  • Daisy Miller (1974)
  • Paper Moon (1973)
  • What's Up, Doc? (1972)
  • The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Voyage to the Planet ofPrehistoric Women (a.k.a. The Gill Women of Venus and The Gill Women) (1968)

SA

 

People Directory

Ronald Radakovich

Ronald Ron Radakovich retired as Vice-President of Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation. A Minnesota native he holds  a B.S. and Master’s degrees from the University of Minnesota. His parents emigrated from Lika and Bosna. Ron serves on several Boards of Directors, including the Byzantine American Alliance of Northern California and the Patriarch Athenagoras Orthodox Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. Former Vice-President of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church and Executive Committee member of the International Orthodox Christian Charities (IOCC) of Northern California, he is currently the Counselor Emeritus of the Serbian Orthodox Church-Western American Diocese. He is a Serbian Unity Congress Board member.

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Publishing

Notes On Ecumenism

Written in 1972 by St. Abba Justin Popovich, edited by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, translated from Serbian by Aleksandra Stojanovich, and proofread by Fr Miroljub Ruzich

Abba Justin’s manuscript legacy (on which Bishop Athanasius have been working for a couple of years preparing an edition of The Complete Works ), also includes a parcel of sheets/small sheets of paper (in the 1/4 A4 size) with the notes on Ecumenism (written in pencil and dating from the period when he was working on his book “The Orthodox Church and Ecumenism”; there are also references to the writings of St. Bishop Nikolai [Velimirovich], short excerpts copied from his Sermons, some of which were quoted in the book).

The editor presents the Notes authentically, as he has found them in the manuscripts (his words inserted in the text, as clarification, are put between the slashes /…/; all the footnotes are ours).—In the appendix are present the facsimiles of the majority of Abba’s Notes which were supposed to be included in his book On Ecumenism (written in haste then, but now significantly supplemented with these Notes. The Notes make evident the full extent of Justin’s profundity as a theologian and ecclesiologist of the authentic Orthodoxy).—The real Justin is present in these Notes: by his original language, style, literature, polemics, philosophy, theology, and above all by his confession of the God-man Christ and His Church. He confesses his faith, tradition, experience and his perspective on man, on the world and on Europe—invariably in the Church and from the Church, in the God-man Christ and from Him, just as he did in all of his writings and in his entire life and theologizing.