A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

George Vid Tomashevich

Prof. George Vid Tomashevich, Ph.D. Mar. 3, 1927 - Dec. 3, 2009. Dr. Tomashevich was of Serbian origin, born in the city of Bocin in what was then Yugoslavia. He came to the United States after World World II. He received his bachelor's degree in sociology from Roosevelt University and his master's and doctoral degrees in anthropology from the University of Chicago. He came to Buffalo in 1968 to teach anthropology at Buffalo State College and retired in 1995. A scholar of universal erudition, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at State University of New York, College at Buffalo.

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His distinguished academic career, including many books, articles and public lectures, contributed to the fields of Anthropology, Sociology, History, Philosophy, Philosophy of History, History of Philosophy and Science, Comparative Religion, Mythology, Linguistics, Folklore and Literature. Prof. Tomashevich, who was born in Vochin, former Yugoslavia, was a survivor of a concentration camp run by Croatian authorities during the Second World War. This harrowing experience stayed with him, and influenced his academic work, for the rest of his life. As a scholar and poet, he wrote movingly on universal human topics, as well as on achievements of Serbian art, history and culture.

His book The Millenniad: Humanity's Road to Maturity, was described as universal in scope, and unusually diversified in content; this work encompasses human efforts, struggles, and concerns from cosmology to sociology. Suffused with benevolent irony and, at times, sardonic humor, it depicts our species’ struggle against early ignorance, fear, and superstition, often institutionalized into powerful and controlling bodies seeking to monopolize the interpretation of the unknown. The whole work is in the form of a poem divided thematically into twelve cantos. It touches upon ancient, medieval, and modern philosophy in relation to concomitant developments in science and technology as they gradually reveal the nature of the universe, its material substance, as well as the problems of life, consciousness, and self-awareness. From the beginning, it also deals with major problems of politics, economics, morality and religion. From the subjective nature of the introductory parts, to the epilogue, the whole work is a portrayal of a modern intellectual’s immersion in, and confrontation with contemporary reality and its open questions. The Millenniad is a massive, erudite, and thought-provoking effort worthy of serious reading and critical contemplation.


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William Dorich

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Best Sellers: The Nursing Home Crisis, Defeat Foreclosure, Sleep Seekers, Kosovo, A Brief History of Serbian Music and Jasenovac Then & Now: A Conspiracy of Silence

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On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.