A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30th, 1939) is an accomplished American film director and writer. He is a son of immigrants fleeing the Nazis, his father a Serbian painter and pianist and his mother a descendant of a wealthy Austrian Jewish family. Bogdanovich was born in Kingston, New York.

He was influenced by the French critics of the 1950s who wrote for Cahiers du Cinema, especially criticturned-director Francois Truffaut. Before becoming a director himself, he built his reputation as a film writer with articles in Esquire.. In 1968, following the example of Cahiers du Cinema critics Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Claude Chabrol, and Eric Rohmer who had created the Nouvelle Vague ("New Wave") by making their own films, Bogdanovich decided to became a director. He went onto work with Corman on the critically praised Targets and Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women. Bogdanvich later referred to Corman and his company as the best film school he could ever have when he made his first feature film.

Turning back to journalism, Bogdanovich struck up a life-long friendship with the legendary Orson Welles while interviewing him on the set of Mike Nichols's adaptation of Joseph Heller's Catch-22. Subsequently, Bogdanovich has played a major role in elucidating Welles and his career with his writings on the great actordirector, most notably his book This is Orson Welles (1992).

The 32-year old Bogdanovich was hailed by a critics as a Wellesian wunderkind when his most famous film, The Last Picture Show, was released in 1971. The film received eight Academy Award nominations, including Bogdanovich as Best Director, and won two of them, for Cloris Leachman and Ford film veteran Ben Johnson in the supporting acting categories.

Bogdanovich followed up The Last Picture Show with a major hit, What's Up, Doc? (1972), a screw-ball comedy heavily indebted to Hawks' Bringing Up Baby (1937) and His Girl Friday (1941), starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal. Despite his reliance on homage to bygone cinema, Bogdanovich had solidified his status as one of a new breed of A-list directors that included Academy Award winners Francis Ford Coppola and William Friedkin, with whom he formed The Directors Company. It was through this entity that Bogdanovich's next big hit, the critically praised Paper Moon (1973), was produced.

Paper Moon, a Depression-era comedy starring Ryan O'Neal that won his 10-yearold daughter Tatum O'Neal an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress, proved to be the highest point of Bogdanovich's career. The Directors Company subsequently produced only two more pictures, Coppola's critically acclaimed The Conversation, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture of 1974 and garnered Coppola an Oscar nod for Best Director, and Bogdanovich's Daisy Miller, a film that had a quite different critical reception.

In 1998, the National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress named The Last Picture Show to the National Film Registry, an honor awarded only to the most culturally significant films.

Filmography:

  • Hustle (2004) (made for TV, ESPN)
  • The Cat's Meow (2001)
  • The Thing Called Love (1993)
  • Noises Off (1992)
  • Texasville (1990)
  • Illegally Yours (1988)
  • Mask (1985)
  • They All Laughed (1981)
  • Saint Jack (\919)
  • Nickelodeon (1976)
  • At Long Last Love (\915)
  • Daisy Miller (1974)
  • Paper Moon (1973)
  • What's Up, Doc? (1972)
  • The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Voyage to the Planet ofPrehistoric Women (a.k.a. The Gill Women of Venus and The Gill Women) (1968)

People Directory

Ivan Božović

Dr. Ivan Bozovic is Group Leader at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, USA. Previously he was the CTO of Oxxel, Germany, a Senior Scientist at Varian Research Center, Palo Alto, California, USA, and the Head of Physics Department and professor at University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia (where he got his PhD in 1975). He was also a Visiting Professor or Scholar at Stanford University, Yale University, University of California at Berkeley, University of Pennsylvania, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University Notre-Dame in Namur, Belgium, and Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielle in Paris, France.

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Publishing

Sailors of the Sky

A conversation with Fr. Stamatis Skliris and Fr. Marko Rupnik on contemporary Christian art

In these timely conversations led by Fr. Radovan Bigovic, many issues are introduced that enable the contemporary reader to deepen and expand his or her understanding of the role of art in the life of the Church. Here we find answers to questions on the crisis of contemporary ecclesiastical art in West and East; the impact of Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract painting on contemporary ecclesiastical painting; and a consideration of the main distrinction between iconography and secular painting. The dialogue, while resolving some doubts about the difference between iconography, religious painting, and painting in general, reconciles the requirement to obey inconographic canons with the freedom essential to artistic creativity, demonstrating that obedience to the canons is not a threat to the vitatlity of iconography. Both artists illumine the role of prayer and ascetisicm in the art of iconography. They also mention curcial differences between iconography in the Orthodox Church and in Roman Catholicism. How important thse distinctions are when exploring the relationship between contemporary theology and art! In a time when postmodern "metaphysics' revitalizes every concept, these masters still believe that, to some extent, Post-Modernism adds to the revitatiztion of Christian art, stimulating questions about "artistic inspiration" and the essential asethetic categories of Christian painting. Their exceptionally wide, yet nonetheless deep, expertise assists their not-so-everday connections between theology, ar, and modern issues concerning society: "society" taken in its broader meaning as "civilization." Finally, the entire artistic project of Stamatis and Rupnik has important ecumenical implications that aswer a genuine longing for unity in the Christian word.

The text of this 94-page soft-bound book has been translated from the Serbian by Ivana Jakovljevic, Fr. Gregory Edwards, and Andrijana Krstic. Published by Sebastian Press, Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Contemporary Christian Thought Series, number 7, First Edition, ISBN: 978-0-9719505-8-0