A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Sts. Sebastian and Mardarije Orthodox Institute III - February, 2017

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SERVICE OF GOD



Day One: Addiction and the Person: A Psychological and Theological Approach


More: soon


People Directory

George Glamack

George Gregory Glamack (June 7, 1919 – March 10, 1987) (born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) was an American basketball player of Serbian origin, from Lika. A 6'6" forward-center, Glamack attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Glamack, an All-American in 1940 and 1941, was nicknamed the Blind Bomber because he was an inspiration to those fond of individuals overcoming adversity. The Spaulding Guide noted that "Glamack, who is ambididextrous when on the court, is also so nearsighted that the ball is merely a dim object, but apparently he never looked where he was shooting, depending upon his sense of distance and direction." The secret of "The Blind Bomber" was looking at the black lines on the court. By doing that he knew where he was in reference to the basket and measure the shot.

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Publishing

History, Truth, Holiness

by Bishop Maxim Vasiljevic

Bishop Maxim’s first book, described by Fr. John Breck as an “exceptionally important collection of essays” contributing to both the theology of being and also contemporary theological questions, is now available! Christos Yannaras describes Bishop Maxim as “a theologian who illumines” and Fr. John McGuckin identifies his work as “deeply biblical and patristic, academically learned yet spiritually rich.” The first half of the book collects papers emphasizing theological ontology and epistemology, reminding us how both the mystery of the Holy Trinity and that of the Incarnation demand that we rethink every philosophical supposition; it includes chapters on holiness as otherness, truth and history, and the biochemistry of freedom. The second half of the book features lectures dedicated to the theological questions posed by modern theology, including studies of Orthodox and Roman Catholic ecclesiology, liturgics, and the theology of icons.