A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

In Memoriam: Metropolitan Constantine of the UOCUSA

His Eminence, Metropolitan Constantine, 76, Ruling Hierarch of the Central Eparchy and Primate of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA, fell asleep in the Lord on the morning of Monday, May 21, 2012 — one day after celebrating the 40th anniversary of his Archpastoral ministry in the Pittsburgh area.

According to a press release issued by the Consistory Office of Public Relations, Metropolitan Constantine was “stricken with a serious illness just a few weeks ago and was released only three days ago from a local Pittsburgh hospital, which enabled him to participate in the celebration of his 40th anniversary of Archpastoral ministry among the faithful of our Holy Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA. 

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This celebration took place at the Dormition of the Mother of God Ukrainian Orthodox Church in McKees Rocks, PA with the presence of his brother Ukrainian Orthodox hierarchs and visiting bishops of other Orthodox jurisdictions, his family from the United States and his beloved spiritual children, the clergy and faithful of the UOC of the USA, South America and Europe.”

May Metropolitan Constantine’s memory be eternal! Вечнаја памјат!


SA

 

People Directory

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic

Marta Milosevic-Brankovic was born in Belgrade, Serbia. She has captured the attention of audience and critics alike since her concerto debut at Ganz Rudolph Hall in Chicago in 2005 where one of the most famous pianists alive, Abbey Simon (Professor at the Juilliard School) personally attended the concert and highly acclaimed her performance of Bach and Chopin. At the age of six Marta took her first piano lesson and already a year later she played her first public concert. She was 21 when she graduated at the Music Art Academy in Belgrade as the youngest student with the highest GPA in the generation. She received her early musical training in class of Russian Professor Jakuthon Mlhailovich, a graduate from the Moscow Conservatory. At the same time she has also completed Media studies at the University of Art in Belgrade. During her studies, she worked with eminent artists from her country and auended a number of piano master courses of the following Professors: Sijavus Gadzijev (Moscow). Tamara Stefanovic (Koeln). Dr. David Abot (Zurich-New York), Dr. Tatjana Rankovich (New York), Dr. Omitry Rachmanov (Chicago-New York) and many others.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.