A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

You Can Drink Homemade Spirits With Serbian Monks at These Orthodox Monasteries

You’d expect to toast “Živeli!” with a drink in hand on one of the famous splavs, or floating clubs, in Serbia’s capital, Belgrade. What you might not expect is that some travelers are toasting in Serbian monasteries — with Serbian monks. There are over 400 monasteries of the Orthodox faith in Serbia — including a few that are UNESCO World Heritage sites —with approximately 200 still actively in use and managed by monks and nuns. Many of these monasteries are open to the public for religious and historical tours and close-up views of magnificent medieval frescoes. Unless you’re a fan of history, a monastery tour in Serbia may not sound like the most exciting time, but that's where you’d be wrong. See, there’s one interesting aspect of these monasteries that most people don’t know about: in Serbia, monks sell homemade alcohol.

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People Directory

Mihajlo Pupin

Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin, Ph.D, LL.D. (October 4th, 1858 - March 12th, 1935) was a Serbian physicist, best known for devising means of greatly extending the range of long-distance telephone communication by placing loading coils (of wire) at predetermined intervals along the transmitting wire (known as pupinization).

Pupin was born in the village Idvor, Banat (then the Austro-Hungarian Empire) to a Serbian family. Pupin emigrated to U.S. when he was only 16.

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Publishing

God Views Us Through Love

by Ignatije (Midic), bishop of Branicevo-Pozarevac

The present volume collects essays and articles written by Bishop Ignatije on man within history and within the Church; on the roots of the Church according to Saint Maximus the Confessor; on how God views us through love; about a call to rediscover our true self in our neighbor; on reconciliation in society and policy; on iconising that which is to come seen in the Iconography of Stamatis Skliris.