A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Djordje Nesic

Djordje Stevan Nesic’s pianism has been described as ‘artful‘, ‘assertive‘, ‘sensitive‘ and ‘quietly virtuosic‘, and his career has been highlighted by recital, concerto, chamber, and collaborative performances. During the current season, Mr. Nesic performed live on A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor, recorded seven newly commissioned American art songs for the Opera America Songbook project, performed in both concert and recital at Greenwich Music Festival’s All Things Stravinsky season; Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Ohana Arts Festival in Honolulu, Cincinnati’s Taft Museum and the Underground Railroad Museum Freedom Center, as well as at the University of Wisconsin and the Next Act Theater in Milwaukee. He was also featured in the PBS broadcast of “This Little Light of Mine” with soprano Adrienne Danrich, which was awarded a midwest Emmy Award in 2011. Among the pianist’s recent Manhattan performances are those at Lincoln Center in its “Meet the Artist” series; Carnegie’s Weill and Zankel halls; the United Nations General Assembly Hall; the River to River Festival; Tribeca’s Ico Gallery; the Trinity Church Wall Street.

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The 2010-2011 season included appearances at University of Richmond; the Mann Performing Arts Center in Philadelphia; the Ravinia Festival’s Rising Star series; and the “Sing for Hope Gala” presented at Lincoln Center. He returned to the Greenwich Music Festival to prepare and perform the critically acclaimed production of Poulenc’s La Voix Humaine.

In his capacity as an accomplished vocal coach, Djordje Nesic spent the summer of 2012 preparing Stravinsky’s A Soldier’s Tale at the Greenwich Music Festival, and Janacek’s Jenufa at the Bohemian National Hall in New York City. During Greenwich Music Festival’s 2009-2010 season, Mr. Nesic served as vocal coach and performed as pianist for Viktor Ullmann’s Der Kaiser von Atlantis. A film of the production premiered at the 2010 Westchester Jewish Film Festival. That same season, he prepared and performed the operas Dinner and Delusion by Michael Sahl and Nancy Manocherian and Clarence and Anita by Benjamin Yarmolinsky at the Cell Theater in New York in collaboration with the Center for Contemporary Opera. He spent summers of 2003-2007 at Glimmerglass Opera, 2000-2002 at the Aspen Opera Theater Center, and 1998-1999 at the Tanglewood Festival.

Earlier, Mr. Nesic appeared with soprano Hanan Alattar at Carnegie Hall in a recital sponsored by the Marilyn Horne Foundation, and performed with soprano Monica Yunus at an honorary event for her father Professor Mohammad Yunus—winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize. The pianist’s schedule included participation as a panelist for Opera America’s “Who’s in Charge of Rehearsal?”, and a Professional Workshop at Carnegie Hall with bass-baritone Daniel Gross, under the leadership of the famed German singer Thomas Quasthoff.

Mr. Nesic coached Audra McDonald in preparation for her Houston Grand Opera debut in Michael John La Chiusa’s Send (Who are You? I Love You) and Poulenc’s The Human Voice.

A Slavic-diction specialist, Djordje Nesic is in high demand as an opera coach, as well as a vocal-recital collaborator. Professional affiliations include those with The Juilliard School, the University of Texas at San Antonio, The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, the Ash Lawn (Charlottesville, Va.) Opera Festival, and California State University, Long Beach. With the Glimmerglass Opera—both in New York City and in the Cooperstown area—Mr. Nesic has been featured in productions sponsored and organized by the company. Under the auspices of Glimmerglass, he has performed as a pianist and served as a panelist in live radio broadcasts from the state of New York’s NPR affiliates WAMC (Albany) and WXIX (Rochester). Television appearances have included live broadcasts from both the “World Food Prize” ceremony and the city of New York for Japan’s FUJI station.

A favorite of festival audiences, Mr. Nesic has performed at the Tanglewood, Cleveland Art Song, Lake Luzerne (NY) Chamber, and Aspen Music Festivals. The list of conductors with whom he has worked features Julius Rudel, James Conlon, Stewart Robertson, David Angus, Reinhardt DeLeeuw, Gerald Steichen, and Robert Spano.

Djordje Stevan Nesic, a roster member of the Swiss Global Artistic Foundation, currently lives in New York City where he holds the position of artist-in-residence at the Broadway Presbyterian Church.

From Official Web-Site


People Directory

Téa Obreht

Téa Obreht was born in 1985 in the former Yugoslavia (Belgrade, Serbia), and spent her childhood in Cyprus and Egypt before eventually immigrating to the United States in 1997. Her writing has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper’s, Zoetrope: All-Story, The New York Times, and The Guardian, and has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories and The Best American Non-Required Reading. Her first novel, The Tiger’s Wife, has been published by Random House on March 8 2011. She has been named by The New Yorker as one of the twenty best American fiction writers under forty and included in the National Book Foundation’s list of 5 Under 35. Téa Obreht lives in Ithaca, New York.

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.