A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Jovan Dučić

Jovan Dučić (Serbian Cyrillic: Јован Дучић, Serbo-Croatian pronunciation: [jǒʋan dûtʃitɕ]) (February 1871 – 7 April 1943) was a Herzegovinian Serb poet, writer and diplomat.

Jovan Dučić was born in Trebinje at the time part of Bosnia Vilayet within Ottoman Empire on 17 February (or 5 February according to the Julian calendar) 1871.

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Rastko Petrović

Rastko Petrović (Belgrade, 1898 – Washington, D.C., 1949), poet, novelist, travel writer, essayist, etnographer, giffted sketcher, camerman and photographer. He graduated law in France, and on his return to Yugoslavia he worked as an art and literary critic. After this he was employed in the diplomatic service and posted to Italy and the USA. He is considered to be one of the most important and most influential Serbian writers in the period between the two world wars.

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Petar D. Bubreško

Peter D. Bubresko, professor emeritus, fell asleep in the Lord December 3, 2006. He was an associate professor of French literature & language at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, which he joined in 1964-77. He earned his B.A. in 1933 and his M.A. in 1935 from the University of Belgrade. He also studied at the University of Grenoble in France (1933-34). He was a recipient of a scholarship from the French Government (1936-39), he studied at Sorbonne under the guidance of Paul Van Thiegen. He prepared in Paris a doctoral thesis on Yovan Dutchich, a study interrupted by WWII. He taught seven years at the junior college level in Yugoslavia and West Germany and later in the United States at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn (1960-63).

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Stephen Stepanchev

Dr. Stephen Stepanchev has inspired several generations of writers who have taken his creative writing classes from 1949 to 1985 at Queens College.

As Professor Emeritus of English, he now spends his time writing and reading poems in public places all across the City, and all the more so with his title as the first Poet Laureate of the borough of Queens, an appellation assigned for the period of 1997 through the year 2000.

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George Vid Tomashevich

Prof. George Vid Tomashevich, Ph.D. Mar. 3, 1927 - Dec. 3, 2009. Dr. Tomashevich was of Serbian origin, born in the city of Bocin in what was then Yugoslavia. He came to the United States after World World II. He received his bachelor's degree in sociology from Roosevelt University and his master's and doctoral degrees in anthropology from the University of Chicago. He came to Buffalo in 1968 to teach anthropology at Buffalo State College and retired in 1995. A scholar of universal erudition, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at State University of New York, College at Buffalo.

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Nikola Moravčević

Nikola Moravčević (Cyrillic: Никола Моравчевић) is a University Professor, Critic and academic writer. He was born in Zagreb, (Yugoslavia) in a family of Serbian officer of Yugoslav Royal Army on December 10, 1935.

After he completed undergraduate studies at the Academy for Theatre Arts at the University of Belgrade in 1955, he moved to the United States. After three years of service in the U.S. Army, he continued his Graduate studies, obtaining a magisterial degree in Theatrical Directing from the School of Theatre Arts at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1961, and in 1964 a doctoral degree in Comparative Literature from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

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Danilo Marić

Danilo Marić was born on August 26, 1938, in Mostar (Kosor), Bosnia and Hercegovina, Europe. Kosor is cetrically village in the Mostar valley – Bisce polje, which has the most rivers in the world: Neretva, Radobolja, Jasenica, Posrt, Buna and Bunica. He was fascinated by these rivers from childhood on, and these waters influenced the development of his character and his literary works.

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Charles Simic

Charles Simic (born May 9th, 1938) is an American poet. He was born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Republic of Serbia), his childhood was very traumatic, as in the WWII Nazi and Allied bombers ravaged his homeland. Simic emigrated to the USA in 1953 to rejoin his father, who was living in New York City. They moved to Chicago shortly after his arrival. Simic first started to write poetry in high school, when he realized "that one of my friends was attracting the best-looking girls by writing them sappy love poems".

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People Directory

Bogdan Maglich

Bogdan Maglich (also spelled Maglic or Maglić) (born August 5, 1928 in Sombor, Yugoslavia) is a nuclear physicist and the leading advocate of a purported non-radioactive aneutronic fusion energy source. Maglich's Migma fusion would use colliding ion beams. He is the son of a lawyer and elected member of the Yugoslav Royal Parliament. At the age of 12, he and his mother were imprisoned in a Croatian Nazi concentration camp for Serbs, but they subsequently escaped.

Maglich received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Belgrade in 1951, his Master of Science degree from theUniversity of Liverpool in 1955, and his Ph.D. in high-energy physics and nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. Upon receiving his Ph.D., Maglich joined Dr. Louis Alvarez's research group at Lawrence Berkely Lab. During this time, he participated in the discovery of the omega meson and invented the "sonic spark chamber".

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Publishing

On Divine Philanthropy

From Plato to John Chrysostom

by Bishop Danilo Krstic

This book describes the use of the notion of divine philanthropy from its first appearance in Aeschylos and Plato to the highly polyvalent use of it by John Chrysostom. Each page is marked by meticulous scholarship and great insight, lucidity of thought and expression. Bishop Danilo’s principal methodology in examining Chrysostom is a philological analysis of his works in order to grasp all the semantic shades of the concept of philanthropia throughout his vast literary output. The author overviews the observable development of the concept of philanthropia in a research that encompasses nearly seven centuries of literary sources. Peculiar theological connotations are studied in the uses of divine philanthropia both in the classical development from Aeschylos via Plutarch down to Libanius, Themistius of Byzantium and the Emperor Julian, as well as in the biblical development, especially from Philo and the New Testament through Origen and the Cappadocians to Chrysostom.

With this book, the author invites us to re-read Chrysostom’s golden pages on the ineffable philanthropy of God. "There is a modern ring in Chrysostom’s attempt to prove that we are loved—no matter who and where we are—and even infinitely loved, since our Friend and Lover is the infinite Triune God."

The victory of Chrysostom’s use of philanthropia meant the affirmation of ecclesial culture even at the level of Graeco-Roman culture. May we witness the same reality today in the modern techno-scientific world in which we live.