A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Karl Malden

Karl Malden (born Mladen George Sekulovich; Serbian Cyrillic: Младен Ђорђе Секуловић; March 22, 1912 – July 1, 2009) is an Oscar-winning American actor, starring in such films as A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront, with the late Marlon Brando. He also starred in another blockbuster movie, Patton, before his best-known role, playing Lt. Mike Stone on the popular 1970s crime drama, The Streets of San Francisco. He also played Archie Lee Meighan in Baby Doll and as Zebulon Prescott in How the West Was Won both starring Carroll Baker.

Malden was born in Gary, Indiana, to a Bosnian Serb father, Petar Sekulovich, who left San Francisco, California in 1910, to move to Eastern Indiana, where he worked as a factory worker in the steel mills, and Minnie Sevarian, a Czech mother, who was a seamstress. The Sekulovich family roots trace back to the city of Bileca in Herzegovina.

He first appeared as an actor on Broadway in 1937, then did some radio work, before becoming a movie character actor in 1940, where his first film was They Knew What They Wanted (1940). He also attended the Group Theatre where he began acting in many plays and was introduced by a young Elia Kazan, who would soon work with him on A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and On the Waterfront (1954). His acting career was interrupted by World War II and Malden served as a noncommissioned officer the US 8th Air Force. While in the War, he was offered a small and important role in Winged Victory (1944). After the war in 1945, he resumed his acting career, receiving yet another small role in the play, Truckline Cafe, with a young, unfamiliar actor, Marlon Brando. Jobs were getting harder to find for him as he was in his mid-30s and was about to give up. He received a costarring role in the play, All My Sons with the help of director, Elia Kazan. With that success, he would then transfer into movies.

Malden has resumed his film acting career in the 1950s, starting with The Gunfighter (1950), which followed by Halls of Montezuma (1950). The following year, he starred in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), On the Waterfront (1954), and Baby Doll (1956). Before and after he arrived in Hollywood, he starred in dozens of films of the late 1950s to the early 1970s, such as, Fear Strikes Out (1957), Pollyanna (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), How the West Was Won (1962), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), and Patton (1970) (playing Gen Omar Bradley), Summertime Killer (1972) and The Hijacking of the Achille Lauro (1989).

After years of starring in films and in stage work, he gained greater fame in 1972 by playing a detective in a 2-hour movie called The Streets of San Francisco. Producer Quinn Martin hired an unfamiliar actor, Michael Douglas, to play Malden's partner, and the show took off from there. During its first season, it acquired highest ratings among many other 1970's crime dramas; the chemistry of both Malden & Douglas were clicking together. In fact, while Streets was on the air, both in real-life and on the show, Malden became like a second-father to co-star (Michael Douglas); as they were actually the best friends. Co-star (Michael Douglas) wanted to congratulate his longtime mentor and friend of more than 30 years for Malden's performance. At the same time, he also presented the Lifetime Achievement Award to his co-star at the 2003 Screen Actors Guild Awards, for Malden's six decades of acting. On many episodes, both Malden & Douglas would perform a lot of car chasing scenes and a lot of detective work; as well. For his work as Lt. Stone, Malden was nominated for Emmys twice between 1976 and 1977, for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series; but he only won one Emmy in 1976.

Karl Malden won the 1951 Academy Award for best supporting actor for Streetcar Named Desire and was nominated in 1954 for his supporting role in On the Waterfront. Karl Malden is a past president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In October of 2003, Malden was named the 40th recipient of the Screen Actors Guild's Life Achievement Award for career achievement and humanitarian accomplishment.


People Directory

Zoran Perisic

Zoran Perišić, rođen 16. marta 1940. godine u Zemunskoj bolnici, a odrastao u Prokuplju.
Filmski i televizijski reditelj, majstor vizuelnih efekata, producent i scenarista, pisac stručnih knjiga koje koriste studenti širom sveta, dobitnik Oskara, majstor za razvoj vizuelnih efekata, dobio je Zlatnu statuu Američke akademije za film 1971. godine za svoj izum, specijalni efekat "zoptik" primenjen u filmu "Supermen" Ričarda Donera. U radu na specijalnim efektima već je stekao reputaciju kada ga je angažovao Stenli Kjubrik i uvrstio u ekipu filma "Odiseja 2001".

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Publishing

Sailors of the Sky

A conversation with Fr. Stamatis Skliris and Fr. Marko Rupnik on contemporary Christian art

In these timely conversations led by Fr. Radovan Bigovic, many issues are introduced that enable the contemporary reader to deepen and expand his or her understanding of the role of art in the life of the Church. Here we find answers to questions on the crisis of contemporary ecclesiastical art in West and East; the impact of Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract painting on contemporary ecclesiastical painting; and a consideration of the main distrinction between iconography and secular painting. The dialogue, while resolving some doubts about the difference between iconography, religious painting, and painting in general, reconciles the requirement to obey inconographic canons with the freedom essential to artistic creativity, demonstrating that obedience to the canons is not a threat to the vitatlity of iconography. Both artists illumine the role of prayer and ascetisicm in the art of iconography. They also mention curcial differences between iconography in the Orthodox Church and in Roman Catholicism. How important thse distinctions are when exploring the relationship between contemporary theology and art! In a time when postmodern "metaphysics' revitalizes every concept, these masters still believe that, to some extent, Post-Modernism adds to the revitatiztion of Christian art, stimulating questions about "artistic inspiration" and the essential asethetic categories of Christian painting. Their exceptionally wide, yet nonetheless deep, expertise assists their not-so-everday connections between theology, ar, and modern issues concerning society: "society" taken in its broader meaning as "civilization." Finally, the entire artistic project of Stamatis and Rupnik has important ecumenical implications that aswer a genuine longing for unity in the Christian word.

The text of this 94-page soft-bound book has been translated from the Serbian by Ivana Jakovljevic, Fr. Gregory Edwards, and Andrijana Krstic. Published by Sebastian Press, Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Contemporary Christian Thought Series, number 7, First Edition, ISBN: 978-0-9719505-8-0