A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

His Grace Bishop Longin

His Grace Bishop Longin was born on September 29, 1955 as Momir Krco in the town of Kruscanje Olovo. His parents were Stanoje and Andja Jovanovic. He attended grade school in Olovske Luke from 1962 to 1970. He entered Three Hierarchs Seminary in Monastery Krka in 1970 and graduated in 1975.

During this time he was tonsured a monk and received the small schema as a fifth year student. The tonsuring was done by Bishop Stefan of Dalmatia on the eve of the school Slava of the Holy Three Hierarchs on February 11, 1975. At the Divine Liturgy on February 12th he was ordained a deacon by Bishop Stefan. On February 13th, he was ordained a priest.

.
Read more ...

His Grace Bishop Dr. Mitrofan

His Grace Bishop Mitrophan of Eastern America Mitrophan (Kodic) was born in 1951 in the village of Ljusa, in Bosna. His elementary studies he completed in 1966 and the Seminary at Monastery Krka in 1971. He received the monastic tonsure on the eve of the feast of the Entrance of the Most Holy Mother of God into the Temple in 1970 and on the following day was ordained as a hierodeacon by Bishop Stefan (Boca) of blessed memory. He completed the Theological Faculty in Bucharest, Romania in 1975. In 1977, after completing his studies, he was assigned as supplent of the Seminary of the Holy Three Hierarchs in Monastery Krka. He passed his professorship exam in 1979 and was assigned as assistant Rector of the Seminary at Monastery Krka in 1980 and as Rector in 1987..
Read more ...

His Grace Bishop Dr. Maxim

Episkopos, Professor, Artist

His Grace Bishop Maxim (Vasiljevic) of Hum was elected Bishop of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church in North and South American at the regular assembly of the Hierarchs of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Belgrade, Serbia in 2006. Bishop Maxim is docent of the Divinity School at the Theological Faculty of the University of Belgrade, and was teaching Christian Anthropology and Sociology at the University of East Sarajevo.

His Grace Bishop Maxim graduated from the Theological Faculty of the Serbian Orthodox Church in 1993. He completed his Masters of Theology at the University of Athens in 1996, and then three years later, in 1999, at the same university, he defended his doctorate in the field of Dogmatics and Patristics.

.
Read more ...

His Grace Bishop Georgije

His Grace Bishop Georgije (Djokic) was born in G. Crnjelovo near Bijeljina, Republika Srpska, in 1949 on the feastday of St. George the Great Martyr. Besides his pious parents, father hadzi-Krsta and mother Krunija, he also has a brother Konstantin, bishop of Central Europe; Ljubomir, a priest in Vrsanima, near Bijeljina and sister Nadezda, a sister at the Tavna Monastery.

In 1962 he left for the Tavna Monastery and continued his preparation for serving God at the Ozren, Kosijerevo, Transfiguration (Ovcar Banja), Savina and Studenica monasteries.

In Monastery Ostrog he finished the monastic school (the first post-war generation). He was tonsured at Ozren Monastery on February 11, 1971. .

Read more ...

Father Philip Sredanovich

The Odd Adventures of an Early Serbian Priest

Fr. Philip Sredanovich is one of the strangest parish priests I’ve ever run across in my research of Orthodoxy in America.

He was born in Montenegro in 1881. He seems to have been educated and married in Russia (the 1920 U.S. Census says that his wife was born in Russia). Fr. Philip came to America just after the turn of the 20th century. In 1908, he made headlines nationwide for his supposed invention of a device to travel around the earth without moving. From the Washington Post (12/11/1908):

.
Read more ...

Father Mateja Matejić

Mateja Matejić (born 1924) (Serbian Cyrillic: Матеја Матејић) - Priest of Serbian Orthodox Church, emigrant since 1945, and the Professor Emeritus of Slavic languages and Literatures at Ohio State University. Matejic graduated from the Slavic Department in the USA where he received his Ph.D.

Mateja Matejić is a founder of the Chilandar scientific project at the Ohio State University in Columbus, where he has been teaching Slavic languages since 1968. He is a founder and director of the publishing house Kosovo, as well as the editor of the Path of Orthodoxy magazine.

.
Read more ...

Father Emilian Glocar

Fr. Emilian Glocar was born in 1906 in Lukavitce, Moravia, Czechoslovakia to his parents, Emile and Josepha.

Originally baptised in the Roman Catholic faith, after the death of his parents, he was converted to Holy Orthodoxy under Bishop Gorazd, Bishop of the Orthodox Diocese in Czechoslovakia. The conversion took place in the Vrdnik Monastery of Ravanica at the hands of Fr. Makarije Djordjevic.

After elementary school, Emilian became a student of the Serbian Orthodox Seminary in Sarajevo from 1923 to 1928. Having graduated from the Seminary, he undertook post-graduate theological studies at the University of Belgrade, from 1929 to 1934.

In 1930, Emilian married a Serbian girl, Bosiljka Parlaceva, in the Cathedral Church of Sremski Karlovci.

On March 16, 1930, he was ordained to the Holy Diaconate at the St. Nicholas Cathedral by Dr. Irinej (Djordjevic), the Vicar-bishop of Belgrade-Karlovci. On March 23,1930, he was ordained to the Holy Priesthood.

.
Read more ...

Father Dusan Bunjevic

Fifty Years in the Priesthood
Father Dusan Bunjevic Honored

by Dawnell Vuko Lewis

To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination into the priesthood, Father Dusan Bunjevic was honored at a luncheon on February 8, 2015, at St. Archangel Michael Serbian Orthodox Church in Saratoga, California.

Father Bunjevic served St. John the Baptist Cathedral in San Francisco from 1964 until his retirement in 1999, but to ensure ample space to the sold-out event, the luncheon was held at nearby St. Archangel Michael's.

The celebratory crowd included the Bunjevic family, many of father's parishioners, people from the several parishes of the San Francisco Bay Area, and especially a group from Indiana where Father Bunjevic had begun his long service to the church at Gary's St. Sava in 1960 and where he was ordained in 1964.

.

Read more ...

People Directory

Borislav Stanic

Borislav Stanic is an art-lover who came to L.A. from Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia), on a visit 23 years ago and decided to stay.

In Europe, he'd been an author and publisher of art books; hoping to find an L.A. museum guide for his own use, he discovered that none existed and decided to fill the gap.

His Los Angeles Attractions (Museon Publishing) is an exhaustive guide to every collection of art, artifacts and vehicles, every historic site, aquarium, botanical garden and zoo he's been able to uncover in Los Angeles County, the world may well conclude that it didn't know the half of it.

. Read more ...

Publishing

Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection

Proceedings of the Symposium on St. Maximus the Confessor

The present volume is a collection of presentations delivered at the St Maximus the Confessor International Symposium held in Belgrade at the University of Belgrade from 18 to 21 October 2012. The Belgrade Symposium brought together the following speakers: Demetrios Bathrellos, Grigory Benevitch, Calinic Berger, Paul Blowers, David Bradshaw, Adam Cooper, Brian Daley, Paul Gavrilyuk, Atanasije Jevtić, Joshua Lollar, Andrew Louth, John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Maximos of Simonopetra, Ignatije Midić, Pascal Mueller-Jourdan, Alexei Nesteruk, Aristotle Papanikolaou, George Parsenios, Philipp Gabriel Renczes, Nino Sakvarelidze, Torstein Tollefsen, George Varvatsoulias, Maxim Vasiljević, Christos Yannaras, and John Zizioulas. The papers and discussions in this volume of the proceedings of the Belgrade Symposium amply attest to the reputation of Saint Maximus the Confessor as the most universal spirit of the seventh century, and perhaps the greatest thinker of the Church. Twenty eight studies have been gathered in the present volume, which is organized into eight chapters, each of them corresponding to the proceedings of the Symposium, all of which are of intense interest and importance. Chapter One brings to light new evidence regarding the sources, influences, and appropriations of St Maximus’ teaching. His mediatorial role as one of the few genuinely ecumenical theologians of the patristic era is acknowledged and affirmed. Chapter Two offers some crucial clarifications on the relationship between person, nature, and freedom. In Chapter Three we find substantial discussion on body, pathos, love, eros, etc. New interpretive paradigms and insights are proposed in Chapter Four, while the next chapter presents the Confessor’s cosmological perspective in light of modern scientific discoveries. Some important ontological and ecclesiological issues are discussed in Chapter Six, while in Chapter Seven we are able to see what contemporary synthesis is possible through St Maximus’ thought. Chapter Eight offers further readings by engaging younger scholars who did not present their papers at the conference but whose studies were accepted by the organizers. In the final paper we find an important overview of the Symposium with a description of the conference’s flow. In an age of plurality and division, it is particularly important to know what our Tradition—shaped by the Fathers—can teach us. In any such endeavor, Saint Maximus the Confessor stands out as the most important theologian of the so-called Byzantine period. Yet his theology, assimilated and incorporated by Tradition, has relevance beyond any single historical period; in fact, the Confessor’s efforts to mediate between East and West distinguish his work as vital for contemporary theological discourse.