A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Hilandar Research Library and Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies

The Hilandar Research Library has the largest collection of medieval Slavic manuscripts on microform in the world.

The Hilandar Research Library’s (HRL) millions of folia of manuscript material on microform from more than 100 different private, museum, and library collections in dozens of countries are utilized by scholars from all over the world. The collection includes several thousand Cyrillic manuscripts on microform, with over 1200 from several monasteries on Mount Athos, Greece, including the entire Slavic manuscript collection of Hilandar Monastery. The Hilandar Research Library also contains a large specialized reference collection, in print and in microform, as well as a growing collection of original manuscripts and artifacts from the medieval Slavic world. Located at The Ohio State University, the HRL shares its space with the Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies.

The Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies fosters and supports research and collaboration in medieval Slavic languages, linguistics, history, and culture.

Founded in 1984, the Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies (RCMSS) is an independent center of The Ohio State University College of Humanities and is dedicated to the promotion of medieval Slavic Studies. The RCMSS maintains particularly close ties, as well as sharing space with, the Hilandar Research Library. Both entities developed as an outgrowth of the original Hilandar Research Project, which ran from 1969 to 1982. The RCMSS is the only such non-national based or oriented center in the United States, although it does tend to promote Cyrillic-based research. The Center strives to accomplish its goals through the support of the preservation and access activities of the HRL, the promotion of research, the provisions of stipends and travel research funds, the funding of materials acquisition and preservation, publication support, and through the sponsorship of lectures, workshops, and conferences.

To date, the RCMSS has sponsored or co-sponsored a series of international “Hilandar” conferences, as well as national conferences, panels, and individual presentations. RCMSS has fostered international scholarship and collaboration by bringing scholars together to work on previously-inaccessible medieval Slavic resources.

Click here to go to the web-site of the Hilandar Research Library and Resource Center for Medieval Slavic Studies

Click here to go to the Collections & Access page

Additional Link: The Steven Enich Serbian Orthodox Culture Slide Collection at The Ohio State University Knowledge Bank

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People Directory

Slavoljub Slavko Vorkapić

Slavoljub Slavko Vorkapić (Serbian Cyrillic: Славољуб Славко Воркапић; March 17, 1894 – October 20, 1976), known in English as Slavko Vorkapich, was a Serbian-American film director and editor, former Chair of USC Film School, painter, and a prominent figure of modern cinematography and film art.

Slavoljub Vorkapić was born on March 17, 1894, in the small village of Dobrinci near Ruma in the Syrmia region, at the time part of the Kingdom of Croatia and Slavonia of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now Serbia). His father Petar, the town clerk, insisted that young Slavko should be well-educated.

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Publishing

History, Truth, Holiness

by Bishop Maxim Vasiljevic

Bishop Maxim’s first book, described by Fr. John Breck as an “exceptionally important collection of essays” contributing to both the theology of being and also contemporary theological questions, is now available! Christos Yannaras describes Bishop Maxim as “a theologian who illumines” and Fr. John McGuckin identifies his work as “deeply biblical and patristic, academically learned yet spiritually rich.” The first half of the book collects papers emphasizing theological ontology and epistemology, reminding us how both the mystery of the Holy Trinity and that of the Incarnation demand that we rethink every philosophical supposition; it includes chapters on holiness as otherness, truth and history, and the biochemistry of freedom. The second half of the book features lectures dedicated to the theological questions posed by modern theology, including studies of Orthodox and Roman Catholic ecclesiology, liturgics, and the theology of icons.

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