A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Zora Mihailovich

Zora Mihailovich is an Artist-in-Residence at the University of Rochester. She did her undergraduate through postgraduate studies at Belgrade School of Music and Academia di Musica "Santa Cecilia" Rome (Italy). She has studied with Carlo Zecchi, Arturo Benedetti Michelangelli and Daniel Pollack. She made her debut with the Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra at age sixteen. Ms. Mihailovich has given performances in major music centers in North America and Europe including London's Wigmore Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall, London's Royal Festival Hall, Washington's DAR Constitution Hall, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Warsaw's Philharmonic Hall, and Brussel's Conservatoire Royal, among others.. Concert tours and festivals have taken her to much of North America and both Western and Eastern Europe including England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Italy, Austria, Greece, Bulgaria, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Yugoslavia.

Ms. Mihailovich's recent recordings include : Anton Rubinstein Works for Piano (1995), F. Chopin Piano Sonatas Nos. 2 and 3, Polonaise (1996), S. Rachmaninov 2nd Piano Concerto & C. Franck Symphonic Variations (1998), W.A. Mozart Piano Sonatas K.282, K.331, K.333 (1999), S. Rachmaninov 2nd Sonata, Six Musical Moments Op. 16, Preludes (2000), J. S. Bach Partita No. 2, W.A. Mozart Piano Sonata in A major, J. Brahms Intermezzo Op. 177 (No1) and Rhapsody in G Minor Op. 79 (No. 2) (2001).


Pianist enriches College music program

Internationally acclaimed pianist Zora Mihailovich would rather not discuss her accomplishments or her remarkable talent. Instead, the College Department of Music artist-in-residence--a first for the program--would much rather let her music and the music of her students speak for itself.

As artist-in-residence, Mihailovich performs recitals, conducts workshops, and works with a small, select group of talented undergraduates. Kim Kowalke, chair of the College music department and the Richard L. Turner Professor in Humanities, says the position was created three years ago as a way to take advantage of Mihailovich's performance and teaching experience and to expand the opportunities the music department can offer students.

"It is wonderful in every way to have a professional performer of her caliber on the faculty. She offers advanced students on the River Campus the unique opportunity to work with a seasoned musical veteran known internationally as one of the world's premier pianists," says Kowalke.

Mihailovich and her husband, Berislav Zlokovic, professor and associate chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery, made the move to Rochester about four years ago, when he was offered a position to pursue his groundbreaking work in Alzheimer's research at the Medical Center. Zlokovic, a world-class tenor, made the decision to forego a professional career in opera to pursue his work as a medical researcher.

Mihailovich, who still travels the world performing and recording, says moving to Rochester and taking the artist-in-residence position has allowed her to work intimately with students, something she's always enjoyed.

"As an artist-in-residence, I play several concerts a year, conduct master classes, and teach six talented undergraduate students in the advanced piano course. I have wonderful students now, and I find it amazing to watch them grow and improve. I try to teach them something new without destroying what they have--their originality. That originality, along with interpretation and good sound, are what makes great pianists."

Born in Belgrade, Mihailovich says she grew up in a home filled with music and developed a love for the piano by the age of five. Taught by her mother, Mihailovich learned her craft quickly and by the time she was 17 had performed with the Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra and had become the youngest person to graduate from the Academy of Music in Belgrade.

From there, she left for Rome, where she studied with some of the world's greatest pianists, a move Mihailovich says was pivotal to her career.

"Perhaps the biggest point in my career was going to Italy and working with Carlo Zecchi and other famous musicians. They loved me and that was big for me. I played in big halls and in small halls with incredible people. It's wonderful to be supported by others who accept and love what you're doing. Those are amazing memories for me."

After leaving Rome, Mihailovich took a position with the Belgrade Opera for five years before returning as a professor to the Belgrade Music Academy. In 1989, she and her husband moved from London to Los Angeles, where Mihailovich was a guest artist at the University of Southern California School of Music, University of Fullerton, and California Institute of the Arts. During her time there, she traveled and performed throughout the United States and in Western and Eastern Europe, taught master classes, and made several recordings.

As a Steinway artist, an honor reserved for an elite group of international pianists, Mihailovich still performs 30 to 40 concerts a year in Europe and across the United States. Playing the music she loves, Mihailovich says, is still as exciting today as it was when her career started.

"I still love playing now, perhaps more than ever. My repertoire includes everything from Baroque to contemporary music, although my preference is romantic music by such greats as Rachmaninov, Mozart, and Chopin; I love the challenge and beauty of their music. And I'm still improving. You can always improve, no matter how old you are."

From University of Rochester


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People Directory

Tomislav Prvulovic

A Life Dedicated to Helping Others

Call him the modern-day Albert Schweitzer - on the front lines, fighting tropical diseases at the source for more than a quarter-century. He has been shot at 15 times in seven different wars, yet has never retreated, and once played a key role in war negotiation settlements between Somalia and Ethiopia.

Professor Tomislav Prvulovic MD, MPH, Ph.D., born in 1936 in a town called Jezero in the former Yugoslavia, has expertise in international public health, bio-terrorism and infectious and tropical diseases. But what sets him apart from conventional doctors is the way he has applied that knowledge.

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Publishing

Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan

by Bishop Athanasius (Yevtich)

In 2013 Christian world celebrates 1700 years since the day when the Providence of God spoke through the holy Emperor Constantine and freedom was given to the Christian faith. Commemorating the 1700 years since the Edict of Milan of 313, Sebastian Press of the Western American Diocese of the Serbian Orthodox Church published a book by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, Holy Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan. The book has 72 pages and was translated by Popadija Aleksandra Petrovich. This excellent overview of the historical circumstances that lead to the conversion of the first Christian emperor and to the publication of a document that was called "Edict of Milan", was originally published in Serbian by the Brotherhood of St. Simeon the Myrrh-gusher, Vrnjci 2013. “The Edict of Milan” is calling on civil authorities everywhere to respect the right of believers to worship freely and to express their faith publicly.

The publication of this beautiful pocket-size, full-color, English-language book, has been compiled and designed by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich, a disciple of the great twentieth-century theologian Archimandrite Justin Popovich. Bishop Athanasius' thought combines adherence to the teachings of the Church Fathers with a vibrant faith, knowledge of history, and a profound experience of Christ in the Church.

In the conclusion of the book, the author states:"The era of St. Constantine and his mother St. Helena, marks the beginning of what history refers to as Roman, Christian Empire, which was named Byzantium only in recent times in the West. In fact, this was the conception of a Christian Europe. Christian Byzantine culture had a critical effect on Europe; Europe was its heir, and then consciously forgot it. Europe inherited many Byzantine treasures, but unfortunately, also robbed and plundered many others for its own treasuries and museums – not only during the Crusades, but during colonial rule in the Byzantine lands as well. We, the Orthodox Slavs, received a great heritage of the Orthodox Christian East from Byzantium. Primarily, Christ’s Gospel, His faith and His Church, and then, among other things, the Cyrillic alphabet, too."