A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Walt Bogdanich

Walt Bogdanich became the investigations editor for the Business and Finance Desk of The New York Times in January 2001. He recently was named an assistant editor for the paper's newly expanded Investigative Desk.

Born in Chicago on October 10, 1950. Mr. Bogdanich graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1975 with a degree in political science. He received a master's degree in journalism from Ohio State University in 1976.

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Before joining The Times in 2001, he was an investigative producer for "60 Minutes" on CBS and for ABC News. Previously, he worked as an investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal in New York and Washington. He also worked for The Cleveland Press and The Plain Dealer.

As a producer for ABC News, Bogdanich and reporter John Martin became the first to break the important story that tobacco companies were manipulating the degree to which cigarettes pumped nicotine into smokers' bloodstreams. In addition to making Big Tobacco look even more corrupt than was previously believed, this made itmore difficult for Big Tobacco to say that it wasn't in the drug business-a claim it was using to avoid regulation by the FDA.

Bogdanich won the Pulitzer Prize in 1988 for his articles in The Wall Street Journal on substandard medical laboratories. He has also won three George Polk Awards and an Overseas Press Club Award.


SA

 

People Directory

Metropolitan Irinej (Kovačević)

(1963–1998)

Milan Kovačević was born to Sreten and Kristine Kovačević on 6 September, 1914, in the village Vrnčani near Gornji Milanovac in the Kingdom of Serbia. Milan completed primary school in his village, and high school in Gornji Milanovac. After completing the course at the Teachers High School, he served as a teacher in the village Ljutovnica near Gornji Milanovac.

In 1941, during World War II, because he was at that time an army reserve officer, he was taken by the Nazis to a camp in Germany, where he remained until 1945. After the liberation, Milan went to England, where he temporarily attended a seminary in Dorchester.

In 1950, he emigrated to the USA, and he enrolled in the Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York, and also in Columbia University.

In October, 1953, Milan entered the Serbian Orthodox Monastery of Saint Sava in Libertyville, Illinois. On 30 December, 1953, he was tonsured to be a monk by Archimandrite Firmilian (Ocokoljić), and he was given the name Irinej. On 31 December, 1953, the Monk Irinej was ordained to the Holy Diaconate in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije, while on April, 1954, the Hierodeacon Irinej was ordained to the priesthood in the monastery by Bishop Dionisije. On 31 August, 1956, the Hieromonk Irinej was elevated to the dignity of igumen (abbot).

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Publishing

On The Holy Liturgy

by Bishop Athanasius Yevtich

The Divine Liturgy is at the center of Orthodox Christian life. It is through the Eucharist that the faithful are united with Christ and therefore with one another. Every Eucharistic gathering is an image and a reality of the Heavenly Liturgy, i.e. unceasing Synaxis of angels and saints around God’s throne. Thus the Liturgy is the proclamation of and a real image of God’s Kingdom in this world.

In this television interview conducted by the Logos, a renowned Orthodox theologian and retired Bishop of Zahumlje and Hercegovina, his Grace Atanasije, brings forth these essential points citing historical development of the Liturgies bringing to light the present misunderstanding of certain Liturgical actions and movements.

Bishop Atanasije aptly points out the necessity for Liturgical renewal, i.e. moving away from passive liturgical attendance to active participation and immersion of the soul and body into a full communion with Christ.

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