A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Jasmina Bojić

Jasmina Bojic was born and raised in the former Yugoslavia. She attended law school in that country and soon thereafter became a well-known radio and television reporter.

At Stanford, Jasmina teaches documentary filmmaking with a focus on human rights issues. To that end, ten years ago, in 1997, she created the United Nations Association Film Festival. This Festival is an all-volunteer effort by Jasmina, its founder and executive director, and the student members of the Stanford Film Society. . For this year’s Festival, 365 films were submitted from all seven continents. Of that number, 32 films will be shown with screenings at Stanford and in East Palo Alto and San Francisco. Kudos to Jasmina Bojic for bringing international filmmakers, the academic community, and the general public together to raise awareness about human rights issues. She is truly a Community Treasure.

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People Directory

Bogdan Maglich

Bogdan Maglich (also spelled Maglic or Maglić) (born August 5, 1928 in Sombor, Yugoslavia) is a nuclear physicist and the leading advocate of a purported non-radioactive aneutronic fusion energy source. Maglich's Migma fusion would use colliding ion beams. He is the son of a lawyer and elected member of the Yugoslav Royal Parliament. At the age of 12, he and his mother were imprisoned in a Croatian Nazi concentration camp for Serbs, but they subsequently escaped.

Maglich received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Belgrade in 1951, his Master of Science degree from theUniversity of Liverpool in 1955, and his Ph.D. in high-energy physics and nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. Upon receiving his Ph.D., Maglich joined Dr. Louis Alvarez's research group at Lawrence Berkely Lab. During this time, he participated in the discovery of the omega meson and invented the "sonic spark chamber".

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Publishing

Serbian Americans: History—Culture—Press

by Krinka Vidaković-Petrov, translated from Serbian by Milina Jovanović

Learned, lucid, and deeply perceptive, SERBIAN AMERICANS is an immensely rewarding and readable book, which will give historians invaluable new insights, and general readers exciting new ways to approach the history​ of Serbian printed media. Serbian immigration to the U.S. started dates from the first few decades of 19th c. The first papers were published in San Francisco starting in 1893. During the years of the most intense politicization of the Serbian American community, the Serbian printed media developed quickly with a growing number of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly publications. Newspapers were published in Serbian print shops, while the development of printing presses was a precondition for the growth of publishing in general. Among them were various kinds of books: classical Serbian literature, folksong collections, political pamphlets, works of the earliest Serbian American writers in America (poetry, prose and plays), first translations from English to Serbian, books about Serb immigrants, dictionaries, textbooks, primers, etc.

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