A great man is one who collects knowledge the way a bee collects honey and uses it to help people overcome the difficulties they endure - hunger, ignorance and disease!
- Nikola Tesla

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.
- Franklin Roosevelt

While their territory has been devastated and their homes despoiled, the spirit of the Serbian people has not been broken.
- Woodrow Wilson

Ruth Stanley Farnam

Ruth Stanley Farnam (September 11, 1873 — December 7, 1956) was an American nurse, soldier and writer. She is the only American woman known to have served as a soldier in the Serbian army during World War I.

Family

Ruth Stanley Farnam was born at Patchogue, New York, the daughter of William Henry Stanley and Ida Jay Overton Stanley. She married Charles Henry Farnam and later, Baron Raymond de Loze.

War work

She originally served as a volunteer nurse in a medical unit attached to the Serbian army. She was present during the Battle of Brod and, when a soldier asked if she was afraid, answered: "Do you think I am scared? I have never lived before". After this, she was allowed to enlist in the Serbian army as a volunteer soldier.

In 1918, she published her autobiography, A Nation at Bay: What an American Woman Saw and Did in Suffering Serbia. She died in 1956, aged 83 years.

From: Wikipedia


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People Directory

Dimitrije Mita Postich

Dimitrije Mita Postich, a resident of Portola Valley since 1972 and widowed since 2011, died peacefully on the 27th of April, 2013.  Dimitrije was born on the 15thof July, 1932 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia where he grew up, later attending the University of Belgrade where he earned his master’s degree in Electrical Engineering in Telecommunications and Electronics in 1957.  Dimitrije immigrated to the United States in 1959 at the age of 27 to join his mother, Mirjana, and father, Milivoj Postich.  

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Jesus Christ Is The Same Yesterday Today And Unto the Ages

In this latest and, in every respect, meaningful study, Bishop Athanasius, in the manner of the Holy Fathers, and firmly relying upon the Apostles John and Paul, argues that the Old Testament name of God, “YHWH,” a revealed to Moses at Sinai, was translated by both Apostles (both being Hebrews) into the language of the New Testament in a completely original and articulate manner.  In this sense, they do not follow the Septuagint, in which the name, “YHWH,” appears together with the phrase “the one who is”, a word which is, in a certain sense, a philosophical-ontological translation (that term would undoubtedly become significant for the conversion of the Greeks in the Gospels).  The two Apostles, rather, translate this in a providential, historical-eschatological, i.e. in a specifically Christological sense.  Thus, John carries the word “YHWH” over with “the One Who Is, Who was and Who is to Come” (Rev. 1:8 & 22…), while for Paul “Jesus Christ is the Same Yesterday, Today and Unto the Ages” (Heb. 13:8).